FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Can sustainability/project highlights be available online?

    Yes, these materials and more will be made available at http://www.seattleschools.org/area/bex/nathanhale_hs.htm in the next few weeks.

  2. What traffic calming for pedestrian movement along 110th? What about a Mid-block crossing?

    Street improvements including a sidewalk along 110th street and crossing to Summit at 31st and 35th Avenues were made during the Performing Arts Center (PAC) project in 2004. We will investigate whether another mid-block crossing is needed to the Summit playfields and/or at 34th Avenue NE. We have learned that the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) is planning on some improvements to the sidewalks on the north side of 110th Street; a meeting is scheduled in late February to review. Work within the public right of way will need to be coordinated with Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT).

  3. How can the south entrance feel welcoming? Display is very important. How can the courtyards be better utilized? Can it be covered/occupied space?

    The south entrance will be enhanced by new glazing and doors, increased plantings in the south plaza, new benches, removal of the brick wall and increased plantings where the maintenance drive meets the courtyard, new bollard lighting and improvements to the bridge access stair an ADA-accessible ramp across Thornton Creek, and cleaning and painting of the building exterior.

    The north and south court yards will remain exterior, but they will be improved with new landscaping and paving, improved drainage, and increased connections to enlarged interior commons and forum spaces to encourage more use. Additionally, enclosing these courtyard would make natural ventilation of half the classrooms impossible and would require substantial storm water detention on site to mitigate the additional roof area.

    In the early stages of design the team looked at covering or enclosing the two courtyards, but decided in conjunction with the School Design Team (SDT) that it was better to preserve them as exterior spaces and enhance them with new landscaping for a variety of reasons including: allowing visual connection with the exterior within a deep floorplate, the foreseeable complications of access for drilling new pilings within fully enclosed courtyards and the needs listed above, for day lighting and fresh outside air to classrooms.

  4. What are planned construction hours?

    Allowable construction hours are limited by city code and established at issuance of the Master Use Permit (MUP), which is expected this summer. Typical noise-generating construction work hours allowed by the city are 7am to 6pm on weekdays, 8am to 5pm on Saturday, and none on Sunday. This project would comply with the hours established in our Master Use Permit.

  5. Why are we replacing turf? What is the timeline/impact to sports?

    The synthetic turf fields at Hale and Summit are to be replaced in summer 2008 or 09. The field carpet has at typical lifespan of 6 to 10 years, and the field at Hale experienced continued problems after installation approximately 7 years ago. This work is funded from a separate budget. The replacement would impact summer community use, but is not planned to negatively impact Hale's fall sports.

  6. Can the parent drop-off along 30th be improved? Garbage/littering are an issue.

    The sidewalk and curb were improved on the school side of 30th Avenue NE during the 2004 PAC project to improve dropoff and parking conditions on the street. We understand that parking and dropoff continues to occur across the street on the west side, which impacts the neighbors. We will explore our options including better training of parents and students to avoid this area, and encourage residents to contact SDOT for better NO PARKING signage.

  7. Can the stream/creek flooding issue be resolved by widening?

    We are not proposing to widen or work within the channel of the South Branch of Thornton Creek as part of this renovation project. During the December 3, 2007 flooding, the creek jumped its banks on the south side and inundated our parking lot and some Parks property, but did not flood toward the school.

    It is prohibitively expensive to work within the creek, and requires permitting from the Army Corps of Engineers which typically takes 3 to 5 years with an uncertain outcome. We have met with Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) to discuss the December 3 flooding, and understand they are proposing improvements to the existing culverts and 35th Avenue and 30th Avenue which should allow the creek to flow better on our property during flood events.

  8. Improvements to doors from the Music Rooms to the PAC?

    We believe the doors from the music room to the PAC have a keyed removable mullion which should allow a grand piano to be rolled between the spaces, but we will investigate.

  9. How will the project be bid? Could we run out of money?

    We are currently applying for approval to use the General Contractor / Construction Manager (GC/CM) construction delivery method with the state, which would mean a single general contractor is responsible for all work. If we use the lump sum delivery method, there will likely be a different general contractor for Phase 1 and Phase 2.

    We are designing the project within budget and have set aside contingencies for inflation, construction change orders, unknown existing conditions, and project issues. If the project is GC/CM we will have a Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP). If the project is low bid, we will know at bid times what the construction cost will be. We do not anticipate running out of funds during the project.

  10. Replace plumbing?

    We are planning on replacing all domestic water piping and fixtures within the building and testing the water quality prior to occupancy.

  11. How will acoustics be improved?

    The architect has an Acoustical Consultant on the design team to help design acoustically appropriate spaces. There is tradeoff in multi-use rooms between acoustics for small events and for large events. We plan on using appropriately-designed walls to limit noise transmission between rooms and hallways, and using acoustical wall treatments and panels within rooms to manage reverberation. We are designing the acoustics in classrooms, commons, etc. to be improved and are expected to exceed American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards by using the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Washington State Sustainable Schools Protocol (WSSP)guidelines as the basis of design for this project.

  12. Will the library parking lot be resurfaced?

    We are planning on repairs or resurfacing of the parking lot to improve the driving surface, depending on what is allowed by code. Current design includes new striping for additional parking stalls and new landscaping.

  13. Will classroom furniture be replaced?

    Yes, we have a furniture budget that should allow all new furniture and equipment for the entire project. This includes furniture for classrooms, teachers, offices, commons, special programs like art, and white boards, reinstallation of the projectors, and some smart boards.

  14. How will native plants be maintained?

    We realize that the District maintenance department is challenged by budget constraints to maintain its landscaping. We are not allowed to use capital funds for maintenance, so we strive to design low-maintenance native plantings that don't require irrigation. We encourage you to support the operations and maintenance levies.

  15. Will elevator be improved?

    Yes, the existing elevator cab and controls will be replaced to be brought up to current ADA code.

  16. What are the noise implications of construction during occupancy?

    Construction is noisy and messy, but we have done many construction projects at smaller occupied sites and this is normal for most other school districts that don't have interim sites.

    We have developed a phasing plan that attempts to isolate each construction area from occupied areas. We will use full-height insulated walls between these areas, and will not be working directly above or below occupied spaces. We will strive to limit the noisiest activities to non-school hours, but are limited by city code. The noisiest construction activities tend to be during demolition, which are mostly planned for summer months, except for demolition required during Phase 2-B. We are also pursuing certain types of construction and methods that generate less noise, such as drilling auger-cast piles instead of driving pile-hammer piles.

  17. What happens to the chimney stack?

    We have studied three different options regarding seismic upgrades to the chimney stack, and plan on demolishing the stack rather than reinforcing it.

  18. What are the planned seismic upgrades?

    An in-depth Seismic Evaluation was completed during early design by our local Structural Engineer Coughlin Porter Lundeen.

    Nathan Hale is mostly constructed of concrete columns with pre-stressed concrete T-beams at the roof and floors. All of the buildings except the 1971 library addition are on timber piles. The concrete construction is solid and tends to be rigid in seismic events. We plan on making limited seismic improvements to bring the project to a Life Safety standard that would allow safe egress from the building in an earthquake, but the building may suffer damage and could not necessarily be re-occupied. The actual improvements are not that extensive and include improved connections between the roof and walls, reinforcing a few shear walls, reinforcing interior masonry walls along exit pathways, demolition of the chimney, and removal of the 1971 library addition. The expected cost of these improvements is approximately 3% of the construction budget.

  19. Any improvements to baseball field?

    The baseball and softball fields to the south are on Park's property; we are not aware of any planned improvements.

  20. How does portable count relate to project phasing? Will classroom count be affected?

    We have developed a phasing plan that respects a maximum of 20 temporary portable class rooms due to a constrained site and the creek buffer. The temporary portables are planned for the south main parking lot (approx. 16), the southeast parking area (approx. 4), and office trailers in the northwest staff lot during Phase 2-A (approx. 4). These portables will displace some student and staff parking during construction. The District has some portables, and others would be leased or purchased. We do not plan on closing or moving any academic programs offsite. Portables used during construction will be removed upon completion of the project.

  21. What will the capacity for the school be?

    School enrollment numbers are determined by a different District department, but based on current planning the school will accommodate up to 1,400 students. In addition to adding several teaching stations; the increased enrollment would be accommodated by increasing the number of students in a class room or other such measures.

  22. Where did water come in during the December 3, 2007 flood?

    The school was flooded by storm water accumulating in the north courtyard, not Thornton Creek. The north courtyard has eight roof overflow drains that direct storm water from the roof into it. This courtyard is served by six 3' area drains that feed into a single 6' storm drain line that heads north to a new storm water main at 110th street. Until the storm event on December 3rd, there was no history of flooding from this courtyard.

    We have done extensive research and believe the flooding occurred from a combination of multiple factors: a storm with more precipitation than a hundred-year rain event, a partial blockage in the 6' drain line from the north courtyard under the school building, minimally sized 3' drain lines, and backflow from the city storm system at 110th Street that was overwhelmed by the amount of rain. We are proposing four different solutions: removing the blockage, increasing the drainage capacity of the courtyard, reducing the amount of paving and increasing the plantings in the courtyard, and adding a backflow preventer to keep water from the city storm system from backing up into the courtyard.

  23. How will the south service entry be reconfigured (how many parking spaces are lost)?

    Most of the south service drive and parking is within the 100' Environmentally Critical Area (ECA) Riparian Management Corridor along the creek, so we are proposing limited work and improvements. We plan on removing the brick wall at the east end and some of the asphalt to create a new native planting area between the parking area and the south entry plaza. We also plan on some maintenance work such as replacing the electrical service, adding a grease interceptor tank for the kitchen, and replacing the underground fuel tank.

    We anticipate that five parking stalls will be lost at this area. Stalls will be increased in the northwest and east parking lots to minimize impact.

  24. Is a student population increase to 1,400 students a given?

    No, this will be determined by the District enrollment.

    Student population comes/goes/with Metro on 35th - must be coordinated with contractor staging.

    We appreciate the advice and will coordinate construction activities and access with student and pedestrian traffic, especially along 110th street to the Metro stops on 35th Avenue NE.

  25. How will shading be addressed?

    The district is currently revising standards to minimize spaces that will have mechanical air conditioning for environmental reasons. Nathan Hale currently lacks air conditioning, except for within the PAC. The current design does not include mechanical air conditioning of the general classrooms. Instead, we are proposing fan-assisted natural ventilation for the class room wing.

    The architect is working to improve natural daylighting in the class rooms and will propose solar shading where needed to mitigate direct sunlight and to minimize solar heat gain in the rooms. Deciduous trees and landscaping will also be used to provide solar shading because they typically lose their leaves in the winter when daylight is most desired and when solar heat gain can benefit energy efficiency. All rooms will be provided with interior roll-down sun shades.

  26. The current Hale philosophy and program is designed for 1,000 - 1,100 students.

    None, this comment was directed at the attendees.

    West side of 35th - problems with parent drop-off. Signs installed then removed? (deterioration and erosion of the shoulder into the ditch)

    See Item 6 above.

  27. How will the renovation affect the fire evacuation plan?

    We are required by code to maintain emergency evacuation routes during construction. We will work with the school to develop plans for each phase; the school graphics class may be able to produce posters.

  28. Was PAC lighting and acoustical treatment not completed?

    Some of the lighting and special acoustic treatments were deleted due to cost overruns. We will meet with the school drama department and look into the cost for providing these during this project.

  29. Will there be storm water detention on site?

    Storm detention was provided for the new PAC. We are required by code to provide storm detention for all new roof areas, and are designing a perforated pipe system in the northeast courtyard for this project but we are not proposing detention for the existing building due to cost and space restrictions. Additionally, we are reducing the impervious surface on the site by approximately 10,000 SF.

  30. Will windows be added to the existing gym to improve day lighting?

    We are proposing skylights for the existing main gymnasium to improve daylighting and avoid the direct sunlight associated with traditional windows.

  31. Are the construction portables scheduled to go away?

    Yes, we are required by the city permits to remove any temporary construction facilities, portables, or trailers.

  32. Is solar energy an option for Hale?

    The design team understands there is a student whose Senior Project is to investigate installing a solar panel at Nathan Hale and looks forward to working with this student to select an appropriate site on the roof that will not be impacted by work to be done on the roof. Otherwise, we are not proposing solar panels at Nathan Hale for numerous reasons including District standards, high upfront cost and a payback period that is prohibitively long due to the District's low electricity rates. We are proposing all new electrical and mechanical systems that will include high efficiency equipment and lighting to reduce the overall power consumption.

  33. How do you balance increased glass areas for day lighting with seismic concerns?

    There are codes that regulate glass performance during seismic events and the modernization will be designed to meet them.

  34. Are we seeking LEED certification for the building renovation?

    In 2005, Washington State passed the High Performance Buildings Act requiring state-funded public school projects to be designed and constructed to the standards of the Washington State Sustainable Schools Protocol (WSSP) or the private U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED Silver. Also, in 2007 the school district adopted Resolution 2006/2007-18 requiring high performance building design strategies to meet or exceed the international Kyoto Protocol.

    The Architects' team includes three LEED Accredited Professionals, and we are striving to incorporate as many appropriate sustainable features as possible within our budget. The District has chosen the WSSP standards as our design baseline.

    See website soon for a list of sustainable features.

  35. What is the proposed energy source for the new boilers?

    We are proposing high efficiency natural gas boilers which may have a propane backup fuel source. We are also exploring a geothermal heat source option for the Phase 1 work.

  36. Please explain why the Nathan Hale & Summit K-12 field replacements need to happen now.

    The artificial turf fields at Nathan Hale and Summit K-12 are scheduled to be replaced as part of the Building Excellence (BEX) III Program under a separately funded project in summer of 2008. The fields were installed approximately eight years ago and have reached the end of their functional lifespan. The turf fields are scheduled to be replaced during the summer when school sports are not scheduled.

  37. Is the Fitness Center moving to a portable? Will the outside caged area be retained; if so, where? Will there be outdoor access?

    The Fitness Center (a.k.a. Weight Room) will be temporarily located in a portable while the new Fitness Center is built as a part of Project 1. The new Fitness Center will be located with easy access to the gym and to the play fields, and will have direct access to a paved plaza at the new east entry and lobby. The design team has met with the school staff and is currently exploring opportunities to provide the Fitness Center with an accessible outdoor space that can equally support classroom instruction and public gathering at the new east entrance.

  38. The sustainability list you provided is good. Other Seattle school projects have had environmental issues related to indoor air quality, what are you doing to address this at Nathan Hale? Are you going for LEED certification?

    The project is being designed according to the Washington Sustainable Schools Protocol (WSSP). The point system for WSSP is similar to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver.

    Regarding indoor air quality (IAQ), the District is committed to maintaining good air quality both during construction and occupancy of a new space. To ensure that the air quality is healthy for new occupants, the District follows a rigorous protocol. First, the designers and furniture buyers strive to select finish materials and furnishings with low emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde. Second, the District has a rigorous air flushing protocol that requires at least five days of flushing new spaces with continuous 100% outside air, followed by a two-week flush before occupancy. Third, the air will be tested by a professional consultant before occupancy for VOCs, formaldehyde, Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide, and airborne particulates.

    The District will also test all domestic water fixtures prior to opening to ensure that fixtures meet the District standards for drinking water quality.

    During construction, the occupied areas will be separated from construction areas with fire-rated partitions. The construction areas will be negatively pressured during abatement and dust-generating activities to keep particulates from entering occupied areas.

  39. How will the geothermal heat source work?

    The design team is pursuing a geothermal system to heat and cool the spaces in Project 1. A geothermal system uses the ground to transfer heat to and from the building through a closed water loop system where the ground temperature is fairly consistent??compared to the less efficient air to air heat pump system where the outdoor air temperature??varies. In the winter the heat pump removes heat from the ground and transfers it to the building via a closed loop water system. This processed is reversed in the summer for cooling. The U.S. EPA has called geothermal the most energy efficient, environmentally clean system available. The vertical well field would be located in the East entry plaza/parking area.

  40. Will there be plans for the science labs?

    The renovated project will have eight District-standard science labs in the renovated project.

  41. How does the District go about designing the schools?

    Design is an iterative process that relies on guidance from the School Design Team (SDT), District administrators and operations staff, school staff, parents, and the community. The project is being designed according to a new District Educational Specification that establishes minimum design standards for all District high schools.

    The design team meets regularly with the School Design Team (SDT), a group of approximately 25 people that includes teachers, staff, parents, neighbors, and students. The SDT provides general design guidance for the project. The SDT has also visited other projects to learn about design trends.

    As the process moves into the more detailed phases, the design team will arrange to meet with user groups designated by the school administration that is representative of each program at Hale. Currently, the Architects are focusing on user group meetings with the occupants of Project 1; the LRC, Visual Arts, Communications (KNHC) and the Fitness Center.

  42. What will the student population be during construction? The SEPA checklist on the website is planned for 1400 students; this is not consistent with the Hale academic delivery which is more appropriate for the current student population.

    The current capacity of the existing school building is approximately 1,400 students and the new project is designed to support this projected enrollment. Hence, the environmental documents like the SEPA checklist must plan on up to 1,400 students even though the current enrollment is approximately 1,060. The renovated school building will be very similar in size to the existing school building in terms of total square footage and number of teaching stations, so enrollment increases would primarily be accommodated through scheduling changes or increased classroom utilization.

    It is anticipated that enrollment won???t change significantly during construction.

  43. I thought this project was just a modernization. Where are the new students going?

    See response to Question #7 above

  44. What about temporary parking impacts and contractor parking?

    The property currently has 284 onsite parking stalls. Onsite parking will be displaced during construction because of temporary classroom portables and the general contractors will use the East parking area throughout construction for staging and deliveries. During Project 1, approximately 78 onsite parking stalls will be displaced from the East lot and south student lot. During Project 2 the displaced onsite parking will vary from approximately 58 to 130 stalls, depending on the phase.

    Considering the Traffic and Parking study completed by Mirai Transportation, there is an average daytime surplus of 72 stalls onsite and over 250 unoccupied stalls on surrounding streets within one block. The displaced parking during construction would be accommodated onsite, on surrounding streets, or at the Summit K-12 parking lot.

    The contractors will have between 20 and 100 workers onsite during the project. Contractors will not be allowed to park in staff or student lots. Contractor worker parking is proposed in their staging area in the East lot and on nearby streets, most likely 110th Street to the north.

  45. What is access to fields during Project 1?

    Access to the athletic fields will be maintained through the South student parking lot during Project 1.

  46. Will there be a new darkroom in Project 1?

    Yes, the design team is meeting with the visual arts teachers and a darkroom is proposed for the new 2D art classroom.

    Based on the SEPA Checklist, up to 24 temporary portables are proposed. Where will they be located?

    We estimate that during Project 2, Phase 2a, up to 24 temporary portables will be required for classrooms. The which building department ??? City of Seattle? Building Department will not allow temporary portables within the 75-foot Riparian Management Area along the South Branch of Thornton Creek, so temporary portables are proposed in the Southeast parking lot (2), the South student parking lot (16), and the northwest staff parking lot (6) all outside of the 75-foot buffer.

  47. What is the reason for adding landscaping behind the grandstand area where there is currently asphalt and a basketball court and parking? The parking departure letter noted that the proposed project was requesting a departure for 21 parking stalls. Should existing parking behind the grandstand be retained to mitigate this shortage?

    The city land use code requires approximately 29 more onsite parking stalls because the student commons (i.e. cafeteria) is being expanded. We will be adding approximately 5 more stalls to the site, so must request a departure for 24 parking stalls that will not be added to the site. There is a public meeting planned for Thursday, March 13 to present the departure request to a committee convened by the City of Seattle, who will make a recommendation to grant or not grant the departure to the building department. Update this ??? ???was held??? and state outcome.

    The area you are asking about is within the 100-foot Riparian Management buffer along the South Branch of Thornton Creek. The City limits development within this buffer. The District has a long-term commitment to incrementally improve the Thornton Creek buffer by removing impervious surface and replacing with pervious and landscaped areas. As part of this project we are removing approximately 10,000 net square feet of impervious surface, the majority of which is within the creek buffer. At the Southeast parking area and the south entrance we are proposing to remove asphalt and replace with native plants landscaping. We are also restoring approximately 500 feet of the creek to native plantings. Parking could be kept in this area, but this would have implications on our overall design for the creek buffer and would only gain approximately 15 more onsite stalls.

    We will propose plants and trees that allow for visual monitoring. We???ll review further with the School Design Team, the school Safety and Security Committee, and the District safety and security department.

  48. What are you doing with all the rain water?

    The new building additions require storm water detention; in lieu of an underground concrete vault, the design team is proposing an underground perforated pipe system (location TBD) to allow for a slow-release of storm water into the local city storm system during major storm events. As an existing condition, the existing building does not require storm water detention. However, improvements to the drainage system within the North courtyard that flooded on December 3, 2007 are proposed. Also, the removal of approximately 10,000 square feet of impervious surface should reduce the amount of storm water that the school discharges into the city system.

  49. Is there a plan to use a grey water system?

    No, we are not planning to install a grey water system at this time. The new plumbing fixtures will meet or exceed code for reducing water usage.

  50. Who do we contact if there is a problem at the construction site?

    Contact Earl Edwards, Project Engineer at 252-0702 or Ian Kell, Project Manager at 206-679-4869.

  51. How are you proposing to heat the building and domestic water?

    We are proposing two new high-efficiency natural gas boilers to heat the water for most of the building heating system. Depending on further discussions with Puget Sound Energy, we may be able to eliminate a backup fuel source for these boilers. If not, the boilers would have a propane tank for backup fuel. We are also exploring a geothermal well system to heat the spaces in Project 1. For domestic hot water, we are proposing new high-efficiency gas water heaters.

  52. Suggestion to utilize solar power for photovoltaic electricity and/or domestic hot water.

    The District does not currently have a standard to install and support solar power as part of capital projects. Based on initial studies by a student working on this for a Senior Project, the payback period for photovoltaic power is very long, possibly over 80 years, mainly because power is relatively inexpensive in this region and photovoltaics are expensive. Note that Seattle City Light is also carbon neutral.

    The design team will continue to work with the student and explore options for using solar power for electricity or heating, or as a demonstration for learning opportunities.

  53. Please explain why the Nathan Hale & Summit K-12 field replacements need to happen now.

    The artificial turf fields at Nathan Hale and Summit K-12 are scheduled to be replaced as part of the Building Excellence (BEX) III Program under a separately funded project in summer of 2008. The fields were installed approximately eight years ago and have reached the end of their functional lifespan. The turf fields are scheduled to be replaced during the summer when school sports are not scheduled.

  54. Is the Fitness Center moving to a portable? Will the outside caged area be retained; if so, where? Will there be outdoor access?

    The Fitness Center (a.k.a. Weight Room) will be temporarily located in a portable while the new Fitness Center is built as a part of Project 1. The new Fitness Center will be located with easy access to the gym and to the play fields, and will have direct access to a paved plaza at the new east entry and lobby. The design team has met with the school staff and is currently exploring opportunities to provide the Fitness Center with an accessible outdoor space that can equally support classroom instruction and public gathering at the new east entrance.

  55. The sustainability list you provided is good. Other Seattle school projects have had environmental issues related to indoor air quality, what are you doing to address this at Nathan Hale? Are you going for LEED certification?

    The project is being designed according to the Washington Sustainable Schools Protocol (WSSP). The point system for WSSP is similar to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver.

    Regarding indoor air quality (IAQ), the District is committed to maintaining good air quality both during construction and occupancy of a new space. To ensure that the air quality is healthy for new occupants, the District follows a rigorous protocol. First, the designers and furniture buyers strive to select finish materials and furnishings with low emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde. Second, the District has a rigorous air flushing protocol that requires at least five days of flushing new spaces with continuous 100% outside air, followed by a two-week flush before occupancy. Third, the air will be tested by a professional consultant before occupancy for VOCs, formaldehyde, Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide, and airborne particulates.

    The District will also test all domestic water fixtures prior to opening to ensure that fixtures meet the District standards for drinking water quality.

    During construction, the occupied areas will be separated from construction areas with fire-rated partitions. The construction areas will be negatively pressured during abatement and dust-generating activities to keep particulates from entering occupied areas.

  56. How will the geothermal heat source work?

    The design team is pursuing a geothermal system to heat and cool the spaces in Project 1. A geothermal system uses the ground to transfer heat to and from the building through a closed water loop system where the ground temperature is fairly consistent??compared to the less efficient air to air heat pump system where the outdoor air temperature??varies. In the winter the heat pump removes heat from the ground and transfers it to the building via a closed loop water system. This processed is reversed in the summer for cooling. The U.S. EPA has called geothermal the most energy efficient, environmentally clean system available. The vertical well field would be located in the East entry plaza/parking area.

  57. Will there be plans for the science labs?

    The renovated project will have eight District-standard science labs in the renovated project.

  58. How does the District go about designing the schools?

    Design is an iterative process that relies on guidance from the School Design Team (SDT), District administrators and operations staff, school staff, parents, and the community. The project is being designed according to a new District Educational Specification that establishes minimum design standards for all District high schools.

    The design team meets regularly with the School Design Team (SDT), a group of approximately 25 people that includes teachers, staff, parents, neighbors, and students. The SDT provides general design guidance for the project. The SDT has also visited other projects to learn about design trends.

    As the process moves into the more detailed phases, the design team will arrange to meet with user groups designated by the school administration that is representative of each program at Hale. Currently, the Architects are focusing on user group meetings with the occupants of Project 1; the LRC, Visual Arts, Communications (KNHC) and the Fitness Center.

  59. What will the student population be during construction? The SEPA checklist on the website is planned for 1400 students; this is not consistent with the Hale academic delivery which is more appropriate for the current student population.

    The current capacity of the existing school building is approximately 1,400 students and the new project is designed to support this projected enrollment. Hence, the environmental documents like the SEPA checklist must plan on up to 1,400 students even though the current enrollment is approximately 1,060. The renovated school building will be very similar in size to the existing school building in terms of total square footage and number of teaching stations, so enrollment increases would primarily be accommodated through scheduling changes or increased classroom utilization.

    It is anticipated that enrollment won???t change significantly during construction.

  60. I thought this project was just a modernization. Where are the new students going?

    See response to Question #7 above

  61. What about temporary parking impacts and contractor parking?

    The property currently has 284 onsite parking stalls. Onsite parking will be displaced during construction because of temporary classroom portables and the general contractors will use the East parking area throughout construction for staging and deliveries. During Project 1, approximately 78 onsite parking stalls will be displaced from the East lot and south student lot. During Project 2 the displaced onsite parking will vary from approximately 58 to 130 stalls, depending on the phase.

    Considering the Traffic and Parking study completed by Mirai Transportation, there is an average daytime surplus of 72 stalls onsite and over 250 unoccupied stalls on surrounding streets within one block. The displaced parking during construction would be accommodated onsite, on surrounding streets, or at the Summit K-12 parking lot.

    The contractors will have between 20 and 100 workers onsite during the project. Contractors will not be allowed to park in staff or student lots. Contractor worker parking is proposed in their staging area in the East lot and on nearby streets, most likely 110th Street to the north.

  62. What is access to fields during Project 1?

    Access to the athletic fields will be maintained through the South student parking lot during Project 1.

  63. Will there be a new darkroom in Project 1?

    Yes, the design team is meeting with the visual arts teachers and a darkroom is proposed for the new 2D art classroom.

    Based on the SEPA Checklist, up to 24 temporary portables are proposed. Where will they be located?

    We estimate that during Project 2, Phase 2a, up to 24 temporary portables will be required for classrooms. The which building department ??? City of Seattle? Building Department will not allow temporary portables within the 75-foot Riparian Management Area along the South Branch of Thornton Creek, so temporary portables are proposed in the Southeast parking lot (2), the South student parking lot (16), and the northwest staff parking lot (6) all outside of the 75-foot buffer.

  64. What is the reason for adding landscaping behind the grandstand area where there is currently asphalt and a basketball court and parking? The parking departure letter noted that the proposed project was requesting a departure for 21 parking stalls. Should existing parking behind the grandstand be retained to mitigate this shortage?

    The city land use code requires approximately 29 more onsite parking stalls because the student commons (i.e. cafeteria) is being expanded. We will be adding approximately 5 more stalls to the site, so must request a departure for 24 parking stalls that will not be added to the site. There is a public meeting planned for Thursday, March 13 to present the departure request to a committee convened by the City of Seattle, who will make a recommendation to grant or not grant the departure to the building department. Update this ??? ???was held??? and state outcome.

    The area you are asking about is within the 100-foot Riparian Management buffer along the South Branch of Thornton Creek. The City limits development within this buffer. The District has a long-term commitment to incrementally improve the Thornton Creek buffer by removing impervious surface and replacing with pervious and landscaped areas. As part of this project we are removing approximately 10,000 net square feet of impervious surface, the majority of which is within the creek buffer. At the Southeast parking area and the south entrance we are proposing to remove asphalt and replace with native plants landscaping. We are also restoring approximately 500 feet of the creek to native plantings. Parking could be kept in this area, but this would have implications on our overall design for the creek buffer and would only gain approximately 15 more onsite stalls.

    We will propose plants and trees that allow for visual monitoring. We???ll review further with the School Design Team, the school Safety and Security Committee, and the District safety and security department.

  65. What are you doing with all the rain water?

    The new building additions require storm water detention; in lieu of an underground concrete vault, the design team is proposing an underground perforated pipe system (location TBD) to allow for a slow-release of storm water into the local city storm system during major storm events. As an existing condition, the existing building does not require storm water detention. However, improvements to the drainage system within the North courtyard that flooded on December 3, 2007 are proposed. Also, the removal of approximately 10,000 square feet of impervious surface should reduce the amount of storm water that the school discharges into the city system.

  66. Is there a plan to use a grey water system?

    No, we are not planning to install a grey water system at this time. The new plumbing fixtures will meet or exceed code for reducing water usage.

  67. Who do we contact if there is a problem at the construction site?

    Contact Earl Edwards, Project Engineer at 252-0702 or Ian Kell, Project Manager at 206-679-4869.

  68. How are you proposing to heat the building and domestic water?

    We are proposing two new high-efficiency natural gas boilers to heat the water for most of the building heating system. Depending on further discussions with Puget Sound Energy, we may be able to eliminate a backup fuel source for these boilers. If not, the boilers would have a propane tank for backup fuel. We are also exploring a geothermal well system to heat the spaces in Project 1. For domestic hot water, we are proposing new high-efficiency gas water heaters.

  69. Suggestion to utilize solar power for photovoltaic electricity and/or domestic hot water.

    The District does not currently have a standard to install and support solar power as part of capital projects. Based on initial studies by a student working on this for a Senior Project, the payback period for photovoltaic power is very long, possibly over 80 years, mainly because power is relatively inexpensive in this region and photovoltaics are expensive. Note that Seattle City Light is also carbon neutral.

    The design team will continue to work with the student and explore options for using solar power for electricity or heating, or as a demonstration for learning opportunities.


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